Monday, April 20, 2009

Prostitutes on Euro banknotes


Position of Ukraine
I recently heard about certain Euro banknotes being altered while searching for some information about Euro banknotes and yes the title says it all. Apparentlypeople has begun to notice some Euro banknotes containing the image of a women presumably prostitutes. The first thing that came into my mind was, well this must be some guy playing some prank for his own amusement, however as I dug deeper, I found out that these were fake notes with a message directed to women. Now you must be asking, why were these women of the night placed on one of the strongest currency of the world and now you will know why.

( A major problem in Ukraine)
Apparently these notes were altered as a part of a sex trade campaign to discourage women from the Ukraine, once part of the Soviet Union. The images, which are otherwise almost indistinguishable from the genuine notes, have been produced as part of a campaign to prevent women from the former Soviet state from seeking to work illegally in the EU. These banknotes show under-dressed women obviously prostitutes leaning against the grand examples of European architecture that have been printed on the currency's bills since its launch in 2002.(What a way to respect national monuments in Europe!!).

There is a message at the left side of the note in Russian warning about the real price of seeking black market employment abroad are printed across the top of the “fake” notes. However let us wonder for a while how this tactic could actually work in preventing women from joining the sex trade as these notes look more like a brochure for tourists informing them that Ukraine has prostitutes for them to hire and might even cause an influx of tourists looking for pleasure and women with no money are attracted to join the sex trade.

The image and message is quite small and would need bionic sight or a magnifying glass to see these minuscule figures for they are hardly of a size to reveal anything, let alone send a stark warning and lets think for one moment,how many of us actually look closely at our banknotesAnd one can wonder how this tactic could either persuade prostitutes to not sell their bodies for sex or maybe even excite teenage boys to start collecting them for their own nocturnal activities. Who in the world actually examines the minute details on banknotes save those obsessed with notaphilia?

Now a littlemore info regarding the banknote and the sex trade campaign The images, which are otherwise almost indistinguishable from the genuine notes, have been produced as part of a campaign to prevent women from the former Soviet state from seeking to work illegally in the EU. They show underdressed women – obviously prostitutes – leaning against the grand examples of European architecture that have been printed on the currency's bills since its launch in 2002.
(Only the 5,10 and 50 Euro notes(fake) are used to send the message)

Messages warning about the real price of seeking black market employment abroad are printed across the top of the “fake” notes. Sex trafficking is a serious problem in the Ukraine. Last year the International Organization for Migration estimated that 117,000 Ukrainians had been forced into prostitution or indentured labour abroad since 1991, more than any other Eastern European country.

Women who are trafficked abroad illegally are particularly vulnerable to exploitation, with the criminal gangs who arrange their transport often refusing to return their passports.Prostitution is widespread in the Ukraine, which is home to more than 12,000 sex workers. The rise of sex tourism, fuelled by wealthy visitors from the US and the EU, sparked demonstrations from students in the capital Kiev this summer.
"DONT SUPPORT ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES"

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